Working out a custody agreement with your ex-spouse may have been difficult, but you have made the best of it and the two of you are doing your part to raise your child. But then you or your ex may consider shaking up the arrangement by moving to a different city and taking your child with you.

If you are the custodial parent and you want to relocate, you can be sure that a judge will scrutinize your reasons for doing so. Your ex may be very concerned about what effect relocating will have on your child. Still, there are reasons as explained by FindLaw why a parent’s move to another community can greatly benefit a child.

Finding a better job

You might be stuck in a rut when it comes to employment and have found a new higher paying job in another city. Moving there can not only benefit you with a larger home and better health care benefits, but it can also provide a better living for your child. Your child may have better clothes, access to more hobbies, and a higher quality education.

Enlisting the help of family

Perhaps you have moved away from parents or siblings and now you want to move back. A supportive family may be just what you need to help raise your child. You have someone to babysit your son or daughter while you take another job or go to class to earn a degree that will help you find a good job. Your family may also pick up your child from school or take your child to a hobby or a new friend’s house.

Finding a better cost of living

Sometimes you can improve your standard of living by moving to another place where living conditions and amenities are not so expensive. For instance, you might find that in another community, you can buy a wider home for about the same price as your current residence. If you can make your dollars go a longer way, you may better support your child as well.

These reasons do not guarantee that a judge will approve your relocation. Consider that a judge will also take seriously your ex’s reasons for wanting you to stay. This may be an issue that you will have to work out with the other parent to come to a mutually agreeable conclusion.