Most carjackings involve the seizure of an automobile from another person by using force or by threatening the use of force. Yet most Georgians consider their automobiles to be mobile castles that protect them from acts of violence such as carjackings. A recent car hijacking in Athens shows how a person sitting in the presumed security of a car can be forced to leave the car and surrender the vehicle to another person.

The carjacking

According to the police report, on August 9, two women were in a Honda CRV in the 200 block of Sycamore Drive, a neighborhood of apartments and condominiums.  The suspect was spotted standing in the road, demanding that the driver stop the vehicle. The driver stopped to avoid hitting the man. As she did so, the suspect allegedly pulled the front seat passenger from the vehicle and kicked her in the head. The passenger was temporarily disabled, allowing the suspect to punch the driver in the head. The driver managed to escape from the vehicle, allowing him to driver off.

The arrest

The victims immediately called the Athens police. The officers spotted a man matching the women’s description of the suspect. The suspect had already abandoned the vehicle. The suspect was captured after a brief foot race and the use of a police Taser. The suspect was uncooperative and refused to provide any information to police. The suspect was transported to jail and is awaiting a bond hearing before a superior court judge.

What happens next?

This case is far from over. The court has not decided whether to release the accused on a cash bond, and the prosecutor can still add additional charges. Anyone facing similar accusations may wish to consult an experienced criminal defense attorney for an evaluation of the evidence, advice on potential defenses and, when appropriate, assistance in negotiating an acceptable plea agreement.